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Speutschlish

meu-meu-meulin:

Someone requested that I teach the alphabet so I found this nifty fingerspelling chart for all of your alphabet-learning needs.

Note: I always learned to spell Z with my pinky??? I guess this is just one of those dialect differences but I actually never thought about that occurring even in the alphabet.

FR- ç

jaimetalangue:

Alright, I’ve seen several missuses of the letter ç in French around this website, so I’m going make it clear for everyone. The letter c has 2 different pronunciations:

  • /k/ when followed by aou, or a consonant - e.g. cascade, crotte
  • /s/ when followed by eiy. - e.g. merciicicecicygne

When you need the /s/ sound but the c is followed by aou, that’s when you add the cedilla: façadeçacommençafaçon

When you need the /k/ sound but the c is followed by ei, the rule is generally to change it into ququequicommuniquer

I hope this is useful and helps you guys make it clearer :)

Directions in English!

To help children remember the cardinal directions, we use this phrase:

Never Eat Soggy Waffles

If you go in a clockwise direction starting with North, you then hit East, then South and last West. So, all you have to do is remember to never eat soggy waffles, and you can find your way home (if, that is, you know what direction home is in!)

Funny story time

So you know how the English H and the Spanish J make the same sound, like the H in ‘hat’ is the same sound as the J in jugo (some places the J is pronounced rougher and throatier, but that’s besides the point of this post).

Yeah, so I was babysitting 2 Spanish girls. They were telling me about what they learned at school. They had learned the song “No more monkeys jumping on the bed” and they sung it for me:

10 little monkeys humping on the bed,

1 fell off and—

Ay no, chicas. We don’t say “humping” on the bed. That’s not a nice word for little girls. Remember, the J in English makes the “Jj, Jj” sound like “juice”, not like Spanish, where it makes the “Hh, Hh” sound like “horse”.

No, but my teacher told me that’s how to sing the song!

And since they were already convinced that I didn’t speak English, but rather “American”, I obviously didn’t know what I was talking about, and they continued singing about monkey orgies all morning.

thisisgoingonmyresume:

This is a very basic German learning resource list that I may or may not expand in the future. As a German learner myself, I find these extremely helpful, but I also recommend buying a normal grammar book with exercises. Hueber usually publishes good German textbooks, which are used even in such places as Goethe Institut.
building vocabulary
1000 words of elementary German
Beginner German
Intermediate German
Advanced German
Vocabulary Builder
pronouncing the sounds
German Pronunciation (IPA)
German Alphabet and Pronunciation
tackling that grammar
Beginner’s Grammar Cheat Sheet [PDF]
Extensive Grammar Cheat Sheet in Tabular Form
A Review of German Grammar
A Whole Website on German Grammar [with exercises]
YouTube channels to fool your inner procrastinator
Get Germanised [includes German word of the day, German fairytale readings, everyday blogs about life in Germany, tons of videos about slang, even more videos about German culture, etc.]
Deutsch Für Euch [pretty much similar to the one above, but the focus is on grammar, pronunciation and vocabulary]
texts in German, because reading is also important
The Brothers Grimm’s Fairy Tales
Short Stories for Beginners [some of them have translations and audio readings]

thisisgoingonmyresume:

This is a very basic German learning resource list that I may or may not expand in the future. As a German learner myself, I find these extremely helpful, but I also recommend buying a normal grammar book with exercises. Hueber usually publishes good German textbooks, which are used even in such places as Goethe Institut.

building vocabulary

pronouncing the sounds

tackling that grammar

YouTube channels to fool your inner procrastinator

  • Get Germanised [includes German word of the day, German fairytale readings, everyday blogs about life in Germany, tons of videos about slang, even more videos about German culture, etc.]
  • Deutsch Für Euch [pretty much similar to the one above, but the focus is on grammar, pronunciation and vocabulary]

texts in German, because reading is also important

Anonymous asked:

i see for your program they say you must be an advanced spanish speaker. What do they mean fluent or is okay if i minored in college?

I minored in Spanish in college too; however, I have a whole lot more of “real life” Spanish experience personally and professionally than many of my current and former classmates. It really depends on how comfortable you are in the language.

There are 4 degree programs you can choose from, and the only one that requires a highly proficient level of Spanish is the Enseñanza de español como lengua extranjera (ELE), which is my program (I switched from International Ed). In ELE, all the courses are in Spanish, and you have to write this huge 50 page paper at the end all in Spanish. In the other programs, half the classes are in English and half are in Spanish. I’m not sure what language you have to write the final paper in.

So it really depends on you and what you are capable of in Spanish. These are Master’s level courses, and the pace is very quick because the program is only a year long, so in my opinion a high level of Spanish proficiency is desired, if not necessary. I know in my ELE program it is necessary, but I also know that there are people in the other programs that struggle more with Spanish.

I would say you need at least a B1 level for sure. B2-C1 is preferable so that you don’t struggle too much. This isn’t to discourage you, but rather to show you that it’s not a happy-go-lucky, “semester abroad party” sort of thing. It’s an actual Master’s degree, and they expect a LOT.

Say this out loud: I talked to her yesterday.

Did you actually pronounce the present tense of ‘talk’?

I do.

Instead of doubling the ‘t’ sound that is at the end of the past simple form ‘talked’, there is only 1 ‘t’ sound. So it actually sounds like “I talk to her yesterday” instead of “I talkt to her yesterday”

Obligatory note: Of course, this may not be true for all English dialects, but for where I come from it seems to be true. 

To that dear anon, after I don’t know how many weeks, I have finally answered your request. Thanks for the patience!

Here are prepositions in Portuguese! You are the red dot.

See: [Spanish] [French] [Greek] [Gato] [Polish] [Dutch] [English] [Romanian] [Italian] [Arabic] [Malay] [Welsh] [German] [Finnish] [Thai] [Portuguese]

mortecinas:

languageek:

Brazilian Portuguese Resources

Free Online Programs
Memrise
Duolingo
Digital Dialects 
Livemocha 

Reference Sites
Dúvidas de Português 
Portuguese with Rafa
Dicionário Informal
Hacking Portuguese
Brazilian Portuguese for Spanish Speakers
Learn Portuguese Now

*One textbook I like is Ponto de Encontro, it has both European and Brazilian Portuguese and is a book for beginners-intermediate or good for reviewing 

*Check out my study abroad experience in Brazil! (with pictures) 

*Tip: if you use Facebook a lot, find pages that use the target language. If you like traveling and want to go to Brazil one day (specifically Santa Catarina), follow the Serra do Rio do Rastro page. I had the chance to go and it was so beautiful and an amazing experience (pictured above). 

What is this? A portuguese resourse post? Such things exist??

reisenviajar:

Don Quixote y Sancho Panza - Caballeros modernos

Alcalá de Henares - September 2014

unfamiliarshoes asked:

Hi, whereabouts are you studying?

I’m studying enseñanza de español como segunda lengua (Teaching Spanish as a Second Language) in Alcalá de Henares, Spain. Here’s a post on study abroad that I did a while back when I was getting lots of asks about it, if you’re interested!

In two hours I will be starting my very first ever linguistics class: Lingüística aplicada a la enseñanza de lenguas

So excited!!!

Little things I’ve picked up in Spain

speutschlish:

…. y pico: ….-something

Por ejemplo: Tiene sesenta años y pico - He’s 60-something years old.

¿Cuánto te costó ese vestido? Veinte euros y pico - How much did that dress cost you? 20-something euros.

Estoy hecho polvo: I’m pooped. (I’m really tired/exhausted)

Por ejemplo: No puedo subir por las escaleras. Estoy hecho polvo. Voy a tomar el acensor. - I can’t climb up the stairs. I’m pooped. I’m going to take the elevator.

Caco: Ladrón (thief)

Por ejemplo: Antes de salir de la casa, asegúrate que hayas cerrado las ventanas porque así entran los cacos. - Before leaving the house, make sure you have closed the windows because that’s how thieves get in.

No hay de qué: De nada (You´re welcome)

Por ejemplo: ¡Gracias por su ayuda!  No hay de qué - Thank you for your help! You´re welcome

I don’t know if these are all specifically Spanish phrases, but I learned them here, so they are new for me at least.

tocar los cojones (vulgar) o tocar las narices (less vulgar): to piss of

Por ejemplo: La compañía le dijo que tiene que pagar 150 euros. Le tocó las narices tanto que cambió a otra compañía. - The company told her that she has to pay 150 euros. It pissed her off so much that she changed to different company.

meter la pata: to put one’s foot in one’s mouth/to screw up

Por ejemplo: El hombre estaba hablando como si fuera experto sobre el libro pero realmente metió la pata porque estaba hablando con el autor mismo sin saber quien era. - The man was talking as if he was an expert on the book, but he really screwed up because he was unknowingly speaking to the author himself.

Atajo: shortcut

Ppr ejemplo: Vamos a tomar un atajo para llegar a tiempo. - We´re going to take a shortcut to arrive on time.

Tirillas: weakling

Por ejemplo: Una persona con poca fuerza física es un tirillas. - A person with little physical strength is a weakling.

Agobiarse: To have something get you down

Por ejemplo: Durante el invierno cuando el sol se pone temprano, me agobio tanto por los días cortos. Siento que ya no tengo tiempo para hacer nada. - During the winter when the sun sets earlier, the shorter days get me down. I feel like I no longer have time to do anything.